Kids in the kitchen The genuine joy of parents and children cooking together in a kitchen filled with laughter, happy chatter, and rich aromas has been all but lost in our fast-moving, flavorless, fast-food world. To remedy this sad situation, world-renowned actor Paul Newman and world-renowned editor Judith Jones have each contributed a cookbook that will have kids and older folks crowding kitchen counters, slicing veggies (perhaps even eating them), stirring sauces, and rolling dough. Fifteen years ago, Paul Newman and his brother-in-cuisine, writer A.

E. Hotchner, started Newman's Own, a modest little company that made and bottled all-natural salad dressing. The rest is history; the company has made over $80 million in profits and given away every cent of it. In 1987, Newman decided to build a camp for kids with cancer, leukemia, and other serious blood diseases. To date over 7,000 children have spent fun-filled weeks at The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp. Now, Newman, Hotchner, and others have put together The Hole in the Wall Gang Cookbook: Kid-Friendly Recipes for Families to Make Together, 78 easy recipes and picky-eater pleasers for everything from soups and chilis to snacks and desserts, plus poems and stories contributed by the brave Hole in the Wall Gang campers. All profits go to the fund that supports the camp.

Ms. Jones (who has edited Julia Child and James Beard, among other culinary greats) and her late husband Evan give us Knead It, Punch It, Bake It! The Ultimate Breadmaking Book for Parents and Kids (Houghton Mifflin, $16, 0395892562). Spiral-bound, it lies flat and has a laminated cover that can take the inevitable drips and spills. There are over 40 easy-to-follow recipes including Basic White Bread, with a step-by-step lesson in bread making; double-decker Oatmeal Bread ; spice-scented Pumpkin Bread ; gloriously gooey Bubble Bread ; pitas, pizzas, and pretzels, and more, accompanied by charming, instructive illustrations and Jones's informative intros. A gift list special.

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