The New York Times best-selling author of Julie and Romeo returns with perhaps her most relatable novel yet, Calling Invisible Women. In a story both whimsical and significant, Jeanne Ray addresses an all-too-familiar fate that many women seem to suffer as they grow older.

Matriarch and garden columnist Clover first noticed she was no longer able to see herself on a Thursday morning. In her early 50s, Clover had grown used to decreased attention from her husband, and to frequently being ignored by servers and co-workers in public. However, on that fateful morning, Clover realizes that she has actually vanished completely and is, in fact, truly invisible. Petrified and fearful that she is losing her sanity, Clover does everything she can to garner the attention of her jobless son, her narcissistic daughter and her overworked husband, but it is all to no avail. They continue as if nothing has happened, ignoring Clover’s plight.

With the investigative skills that she previously used as a reporter (before being demoted to the gardening column), Clover discovers to both her dismay and excitement that there are other women out there just like her. Women who have lost their jobs and their looks—but most importantly, lost their ability to be recognized by the loved ones around them. With the newfound knowledge that she is not alone, Clover goes about town, slowly learning more about her family, and most importantly, herself. (Being invisible does have its perks when it comes to accessing secret information!) As she gains confidence, Clover discovers there’s a reason for her “disability,” and her quest for a cure involves hilarious adventures (naked traveling via airplane, for one) as she leads an army of invisible women on a crusade to get noticed. Heartfelt, inspirational and uplifting, Calling Invisible Women calls out to readers with a passionate and important message. This book is clearly one that deserves to be noticed.

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