Sometimes being God has its benefits. The whole “creating and naming everything on earth” gig was kind of a blast, and so is engineering the occasional cosmic miracle. And, of course, being able to seduce any woman on the planet is not a bad perk. Just ask Bob. Since being appointed God, he’s had his share of beautiful girls—and he’s also created his share of natural disasters, when (like any teenage boy in the throes of lust and heartbreak) he reacts badly if things don’t quite turn out according to plan.

Bob may have met his match in the form of Lucy, a voluptuous young zoo employee who’s eager to settle down, although maybe not with the Creator of the Universe. Bob’s petulance during his courtship of Lucy wreaks some serious havoc worldwide (is it global warming or a pouting God?). Meanwhile, Bob’s provocative mother has gambled away the only creature who loves Bob more than he loves himself, and Bob’s sidekick, Mr. B., is plugging away at the less glamorous godly work of answering prayers and making sure the world doesn’t fall apart entirely.

The idea of gods behaving badly is at least as old as Greek and Roman myth; envisioning a hormone-addled modern-day Judeo-Christian God, however, is a provocative premise, and one that Meg Rosoff is more than capable of handling. In the past, she’s been known for dark, evocative, apocalyptic work, like the Printz Award-winning How I Live Now; in this, her first foray into satire, she also reveals herself to be irreverent, insightful and very, very funny.

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Read our interview with Meg Rosoff for There Is No Dog.

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