SFoB posterAs we posted yesterday in our News update, this weekend is one of the most anticipated literary events of the year for readers in the South. The Southern Festival of Books will descend on Nashville this Friday through Sunday.

The Festival is organized by Humanities Tennessee. According to the SFoB site:

The Festival annually welcomes more than 200 authors from throughout the nation and in every genre for readings, panel discussions and book signings. Book lovers have the opportunity to hear from and meet some of America's foremost writers in fiction, history, mystery, food, biography, travel, poetry and children's literature among others.

If you can make it to Nashville this weekend, it’d be well worth your time to check out the lineup of authors and events (in addition to readings, there are music performances and children’s programs).

There are too many great Festival events to write about everything, although here are a few BookPage-recommended highlights (check the Festival schedule for locations and confirmed times):millionaires

Inman Majors (1-2 p.m. on Friday) will discuss his third novel, The Millionaires, a “story of two small-town brothers who rise to dangerous big-city heights.” In the May edition of BookPage, Majors told us, “I think it was Faulkner who said that all writers are frustrated actors. So I loved waking up each morning and putting on a different character’s outfit each day.”

Trenton Lee Stewart (9-10 a.m. on Saturday), will speak about the latest installation in the Mysterious Benedict Society series: The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Prisoner’s Dilemma. (Disclosure: I reviewed this MBSbook and will be hosting the session at the Festival.) In this children’s adventure novel, four children “thoughtfully discuss actions and consequences, make sacrifices and explore themes of trust and forgiveness”… in addition to “cracking puzzles and battling the evil Mr. Curtain.”

magician's elephantKate DiCamillo (10-11 a.m. on Saturday), the Newbury Award-winning author of The Tale of Despereaux, will read from her latest children’s book, The Magician’s Elephant. Our reviewer gave the book a rave review, writing: “Everything about this story is masterful. The prose is remarkably simple, with underpinnings of delicious dry humor.”

Robert Hicks (11-12 noon on Saturday) will discuss his novel, A Separate Country: “Part historical novel, part love letter to New Orleans, A Separate Country is the remarkable new novel by Robert Hicks, author of the bestseller The separate countryWidow of the South. Based on the real life of Confederate General John Bell Hood, the novel imagines Hood in the years after the war, crippled and trying to find peace despite his infamy.”

Jacquelyn Mitchard (11-12 noon on Saturday) will discuss her book No no time to wave goodbyeTime to Wave Goodbye. In a column from the September issue of BookPage, Mitchard wrote: No Time to Wave Goodbye takes up “where my first novel, The Deep End of the Ocean, left off, 13 years ago. But it begins a series of new events, not a new take on old ones. What I learned from No Time to Wave Goodbye, other than that I could do this with dignity, was that I had the time of my life. I didn’t realize how vital these ancient characters still were. I didn’t recognize the places they inhabit in my writer’s heart.”

Alice Randall (12-1 p.m. on Saturday) will discuss Rebel Yell,rebel yell “which brings together two hot-button issues—race and terrorism—in what Randall calls ‘a very grown-up novel.’” In an interview with BookPage, Randall said of a message in the book: “It is my experience that terrified people and terrified nations must hold tight to their courage, to their humanity, to their very willingness to die before they would do something wrong.”

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