Psychological thriller Bleed for Me by Michael Robotham is our March Mystery of the Month! Whodunit columinst Bruce Tierney says it combines "the insights of a trained psychologist; the savvy street smarts and irreverent observations of a retired cop; and intricate plotting from a first-rate author."

BookPage chatted with Robotham in a 7 Questions interview, where he shares insight on writing, his experiences with Jackie Collins and what he's working on next.

Read on for an excerpt from Chapter 1 of Bleed for Me, when psychologist Joe O’Loughlin questions a boy whose mental health is being reviewed (Dr Naparstek is the boy's psychiatrist):

If I could tell you one thing about Liam Baker’s life it would be this: when he was eighteen years old he beat a girl half to death and left her paralysed from the waist down because she tipped a bucket of popcorn over his head. As defining events go, nothing else comes close for Liam, not the death of his mother or his faith in God or the three-years he has spent in a secure psychiatric hospital – all of which can be attributed, in one way or another, to that moment of madness in a cinema queue.


...


‘It’s been a while since I saw you last, Liam. Remind me again why
you’re here.’


‘I did a bad thing, but I’m better now.’


There it is: an admission and an excuse in the same breath.


‘So why are you here?’


‘You sent me here.’


‘I must have had a reason.’


‘I had a per...per...personality disorder.’


‘What do you think that means?’


‘I hurt someone, but it weren’t my fault. I couldn’t help it.’ He leans forward, elbows on his knees, eyes on the floor.


‘You beat a girl up. You punched and kicked her. You crushed her spine. You broke her jaw. You fractured her skull. Her name was Zoe Hegarty. She was sixteen.’


Each fact resonates as though I’m clashing cymbals next to his ear, but nothing changes in his eyes.


‘I’m sorry.’


‘What are you sorry for?’


‘For what I d-d-did.’


‘And now you’ve changed?'


He nods.


‘What have you done to change?’


He looks perplexed.


‘Hostility like that has to come from somewhere, Liam. What have you
done to change?’


He begins talking about the therapy sessions and workshops that he’s done, the anger management courses and social skills training. Occasionally, he looks over his shoulder towards Dr Naparstek, but I ask him to concentrate on me.


‘Tell me about Zoe?’


‘What about her?’


‘What was she like?’


He shakes his head. ‘I don’t remember.’


‘Did you fancy her?’


Liam flinches. ‘It w-w-weren’t like that.’


‘You followed her home from the cinema. You dragged her off the street. You kicked her unconscious.’


‘I didn’t rape her.’


‘I didn’t say anything about raping her. Is that what you intended to do?’


Liam shakes his head, tugging at the sleeves of his shirt. His eyes are focused on the far wall, as if watching some invisible drama being played out on a screen that nobody else can see.


‘You once told me that Zoe wore a mask. You said a lot of people wore masks and weren’t genuine. Do I wear a mask?’


‘No.’ ‘


What about Dr Naparstek?’


The mention of her name makes his skin flush.


‘N-n-no.’


‘How old are you now, Liam?’


‘Twenty-two.’ ‘


Tell me about your dreams.’


He blinks at me.


‘What do you dream about?’


'Getting out of here. Starting a n-n-new life.’


‘Do you masturbate?’


‘No.’


‘I don’t believe that’s true, Liam.’


He shakes his head.


‘What’s wrong?’


‘You shouldn’t talk about stuff like that.’


‘It’s very natural for a young man. When you masturbate who do you
think about?’


‘Girls.’


‘There aren’t many girls around here. Most of the staff are men.’


‘G-g-girls in magazines.’


‘Dr Naparstek is a woman. How often do you get to see Dr Naparstek? Twice a week? Three times? Do you look forward to your sessions?’


‘She’s been good to me.’


‘How has she been good to you?’


‘She doesn’t judge me.’


‘Oh, come on, Liam, of course she judges you. That’s why she’s here. Do you ever have sexual fantasies about her?’


He bristles. Edgy. Uncomfortable.


‘You shouldn’t say things like that.’


‘Like what?’


‘About her.’


‘She’s a very attractive woman, Liam. I’m just admiring her.’


I look over his shoulder. Dr Naparstek doesn’t seem to appreciate the compliment. Her lips are pinched tightly and she’s toying with a pendant around her neck.


‘What do you prefer, Liam, winter or summer?’


‘Summer.’


‘Day or night?’


‘Night.’


‘Apples or oranges?’


‘Oranges.’


‘Coffee or tea?’


‘Tea.’


‘Women or men?’


‘Women.’


‘In skirts or trousers?’


‘Skirts.’


‘Long or short?’


‘Short.’


‘Stockings or tights?’


‘Stockings.’


‘What colour lipstick?’


‘Red.’


‘What colour eyes does she have?’


‘Blue.’


‘What is she wearing today?’


‘A skirt.’


‘What colour is her bra?’


‘Black.’


‘I didn’t mention a name, Liam. Who are you talking about?’


He stiffens, embarrassed, his face a beacon. I notice his left knee
bouncing up and down in a reflex action.


‘Do you think Dr Naparstek is married?’ I ask.


‘I d-d-don’t know.’


‘Does she wear a wedding ring?’


‘No.’


‘Maybe she has a boyfriend at home. Do you think about what she does when she leaves this place? Whether there is someone waiting for her? What does her house look like? What does she wear when she’s at home? Does she sleep naked?’


Flecks of white spin are gathered in the corners of Liam’s mouth.


Dr Naparstek wants to stop the questioning, but the Judge tells her to sit down.


Liam tries to turn but I lean forward and put my hands on his shoulders, my mouth close to his ear. I can smell the sweat wetting the roots of his hair and see a fleck of shaving foam beneath his ear.


In a whisper, ‘You think about her all the time, don’t you, Liam? The smell of her skin, her shampoo, the delicate shell of her ear, the shadow in the hollow between her breasts . . .every time you see her, you collect more details so that you can fantasise about what you want to do to her.’


Liam’s skin has flushed and his breathing has gone ragged.


‘You fantasise about following her home – just like you followed Zoe Hegarty. Dragging her off the street. Making her beg you to stop.’


The Judge suddenly interrupts. ‘We can’t hear your questions, Professor. Please speak up.’


The spell is broken. Liam remembers to breathe.


‘My apologies,’ I say, glancing at the review panel. ‘I was just telling Liam that I might ask Dr Naparstek out to dinner.’


The suspense only builds from there! You can read the rest of Chapter 1 here.

Will you pick up Bleed for Me? It's out now!

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