• The literary world lost one of its greats today. Chinua Achebe has passed away, but no doubt his masterpiece Things Fall Apart will continue to be read by students around the world.

• The Los Angeles Times shares an adorably spunky job inquiry letter that Eudora Welty sent to the New Yorker back in 1933. We would have hired her!

• BuzzFeed has compiled a fun collection of bookplates from 35 famous folks, from Henry Houdini and Walt Disney to Charles Dickens and Sigmund Freud.

• Tuesday was Philip Roth's 80th birthday, and the New Yorker's David Remnick fills us in on what happened at the party.

• Can you imagine having David Foster Wallace or Vladimir Nabokov as a professor? Flavorwire has assembled recollections of super-lucky students who were in classes taught by literary superstars.

• It's always interesting to hear recordings of writers who are long-gone. Brain Pickings has posted an excerpt of Ernest Hemingway's 1954 Nobel Prize in Literature acceptance speech, along with the story behind why he didn't attend the ceremony.

• Did you know that The Joy of Cooking was originally self-published? Book Patrol reports that one of the 3,000 copies published by Irma S. Rombauer in 1931 is up for sale . . . for a mere $40,000.

• A fascinating article from The Atlantic examines how feminism has finally seeped into the romance book genre.

• Of course, we know that books aren't going anywhere, but Fine Books & Collections has posted a list of 10 reassuring signs that should sway even pessimists.

•  Stumped on your next read? Flavorwire has put together a list of 10 Millennial writers you may not know about. Included on the list are Kristopher Jansma and Evie Wyld.

• We can always count on McSweeney's for a chuckle or two and weren't let down by An Open Letter to Canonical Authors.

• Move over tattoos—Buzzfeed has assembled a fun photo collection of literary graffiti from around the world.

• The New York Times has us on pins and needles waiting for next month's release of The Selected Letters of Willa Cather.

• And finally, to follow up on an item in our post from a couple of weeks ago, the Diagram Prize for Oddest Book Title of the Year has been been awarded to—drum roll, please—. . . .

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